Berkana Staff

The Berkana Institute staff curently consists of individuals working to coordinate and hold Warriors for the Human Spirit Trainings.

Margaret WheatleyMargaret (Meg) Wheatley, Ed.D. President and founder of The Berkana Institute. Margaret Wheatley writes, teaches and speaks about how we can use our power and influence and willingly step forward to serve this troubling time. As things grow darker and more difficult, she summons us to reclaim leadership as a noble profession that creates possibility and humaneness in the midst of increasing fear and turmoil by creating Islands of Sanity.

Since 1973, Meg has taught, consulted, and advised an unusually broad variety of organizations on all continents (except Antarctica). Her clients and audiences range from the head of the U.S. Army to twelve-year-old Girl Scouts, from CEOs and government ministers to small town ministers, from large universities to rural aboriginal villages. In her teachings and newest book, she challenges leaders with these questions: Who do we choose to be for this time? Do we contribute to the deterioration of human capacity by our silence and compliance, or do we act bravely and use our power and influence to champion the human spirit? Can we use the resources we have available to create islands of sanity wherever possible?

Since 1992, she has published nine award-winning books. Her newest book (June 2017) is Who Do We Choose To Be? Facing Reality| Claiming Leadership| Restoring Sanity. Using new science, history, and social critiques, she details where we are as a global culture, and the choices we have to make as leaders, summoning us to be Warriors for the Human Spirit. Her primary work since 2014 has been to train experienced leaders in the skills they need to stay present, discerning and compassionate in the midst of the difficult situations that all leaders now find themselves in.

Her first book was the path-breaking Leadership and the New Science (1992, ’99, ’07 in 18 languages). In 2012, she published So Far From Home: Lost and Found in Our Brave New World, describing how we ended up in a world no one wants, a harsh, destructive world that’s emerged in spite of our best efforts to change it.  In 2014, she published How Does Raven Know? a personal meditative memoir describing her experiences of working with sacred world.

Her five other books are: Walk Out Walk On: A Learning Journey Into Communities Daring to Live the Future Now. Co-author Deborah Frieze. (2011); Perseverance (2010); Turning to One Another: Simple Conversations to Restore Hope to the Future (2002, 2009); Finding Our Way: Leadership for an Uncertain Time (2005); A Simpler Way. Co-author Myron Kellner-Rogers. (1996)

Meg earned her doctorate in Organizational Behavior from Harvard University (1979), a masters in Media Ecology from New York University with Neil Postman (1972), and a B.A. in History and Literature from the University of Rochester, N.Y. She has been a global citizen since her youth, serving in the Peace Corps in Korea in the 1960s. She began her career as a public school teacher, and also has been a professor in two graduate management programs (Brigham Young University and Cambridge College Massachusetts).

Meg has received several awards and honorary doctorates. Her most recent awards are: the Leadership Legacy Award for Lifetime Achievement of the International Leadership Association (2014), where she was inducted into the Leadership Hall of Fame; the Clara Snell Woodbury Distinguished Women’s Leadership Award (2016); The Loretto Community’s Mary Rhodes Award for her international work with women and grassroots traditions (2015).

In 2002, The American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) honored her for her contribution “to workplace learning and development” and dubbed her “a living legend.” In April 2005, she was elected to the Leonardo Da Vinci Society for the Study of Thinking for her contribution to the field of systems thinking. In 2010, she was appointed by The White House and the Secretary of the Interior to serve on the National Advisory Board of the National Parks System; her primary responsibility is to support the growth of a 21st century culture of adaptation and innovation in 400+ national parks. She continues to serve on this Advisory Board and counts it as one of the most rewarding experiences of her life.

She returns from her frequent global travels to her home in the mountains of Utah and the true peace of wilderness. She has raised a large family now dispersed throughout the U.S. and is a very happy mother and grandmother, with 21 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren.

www.margaretwheatley.com

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